Go directly to content
Give me five #48 Vivian Caccuri

La Casa On, Literature

Give me five #48 Vivian Caccuri

22 May

La Casa Encendida
Ronda de Valencia, 2
Madrid
28012
Spain

Online activity

Vivian Caccuri uses sound as the vehicle to cross experiments in sensory perception with issues related to history and social conditioning. Through objects, installations, and performances, her pieces create situations that disorient everyday experience.

  • I have been very interested in games lately, especially in ecological approaches to games such as simpler, lighter games that don't require a lot of energy consumption. Embracelet is one of those games, however not at all simplistic. With an amazing soundtrack, the player will be able to travel to a small island in Northern Norway, where they will need to solve puzzles, talk to people, build relationships and recover hidden stories from the past.
  • A book that has been with me for some months now is Music: A Subversive History, by Ted Gioia. The book tells the history of the origins of music through the lenses of subversion, revolution and power play. It is a refreshing anthropological take on music history that is revelatory and inspiring.
  • Spotify, Apple Music and Tidal should have a <1000 genre, a genre that contemplates artists with less than a thousand plays or less than a hundred monthly listeners. Brazilian independent producer Africanoise right now is one of these artists and that is not an issue at all. On the contrary: it sounds new and fearless, it sounds just...necessary.
  • Lute Music for Alchemists is probably the playlist with the weirdest name Spotify has ever made. It is stunning though. I love how the sound of lute (laúd) is calming sliding in Renaissance's brightest musical scales. It organizes thought with a hint of mystery.
  • Brazilian film Medida Provisória hasn't yet been released and I'm already obsessed with it. In a dystopic future, the congress will approve an executive order in favor of the historical reparation of racism in Brazil. This is not fiction: Bolsonaro wants to boycott it, censor it, he will try to stop the film at all costs. It already worked as a powerful disruptive narrative.

Vivian Caccuri uses sound as the vehicle to cross experiments in sensory perception with issues related to history and social conditioning. Through objects, installations, and performances, her pieces create situations that disorient everyday experience and, by extension, disrupt meanings and narratives seemingly as ingrained as the cognitive structure itself. She wrote her first book “Music is What I Make” (2012), published in Brazil and awarded by Funarte Prize of Critical Production in Music in 2013. Recently, Vivian released her first vynil record, composed and produced at the Studio Acusticum conservatorium in North Sweden and her second book, a compilation of texts about sound in Brazilian Art, published by Bloomsbury NYC.

Don’t miss a thing! Sign up for our

Newsletter

* When providing your data, check the corresponding box that you want to receive the Newsletter.

Loading...